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Survey shows 2018 yields down for nearly all arable crops

Strutt & Parker’s annual Harvest Yields Survey highlights the difficulties many growers faced this summer, showing that yields were lower than in 2017 for everything except second wheats and winter barley.

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Strutt & Parker’s annual Harvest Yields Survey highlights the difficulties many growers faced this summer, showing that yields were lower than in 2017 for everything except second wheats and winter barley.

 

The data is based on the performance of combinable crops across nearly 50,000 hectares in the East of England, Midlands and South East England.

 

According to the results, the overall winter wheat yield for 2018 was 8.5t/ha, which was seven per cent lower than in 2017 and nine per cent lower than the five-year average, although higher than the DEFRA national average of 7.8t/ha.

 

First wheats averaged 8.7t/ha (down from 9.5t/ha in 2017), while second wheats averaged 8t/ha – three per cent higher than last year, when second wheats struggled because of a dry start to the spring which limited the uptake of nitrogen.


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Extreme weather

 

Tom FitzGerald, farm consultant and agronomist with Strutt & Parker, says: “These new results are a reminder of the difficult growing season many farmers faced because of the extreme weather in 2018, although there were positives such as some high quality crops, negligible drying costs and higher grain prices.

 

“While we had good establishment of autumn crops, a prolonged winter and wet spring delayed the drilling of spring crops and this was then followed by drought conditions from the end of May until mid-August, with ear emergence, flowering and grain fill all affected as a result.

 

“The weather is always a huge unknown for farmers so, once again in 2019, the priority should be focusing on the areas which growers can influence, such as boosting performance though close attention to detail and finding ways to make cost savings.

 

“However, recent analysis from scientists at the Met Office suggests we now live in a climate in which heatwaves will occur much more frequently due to climate change, so growers need to start thinking of ways to adapt to less moderate and predictable weather than we have been used to.

 

“We already know that arable crop production is set to get tougher in the UK, with margins likely to tighten as direct payments are phased out as part of the Agricultural Bill. The chemical control of pests, weeds and diseases is also becoming more challenging, due to the reduction in available chemistry and growing resistance problems. Growers may want to consider whether there are new crops which could help to make their rotation more resilient to extremes of weather, for example by improving drainage and soil microflora or by reducing soil borne pests and diseases.”

Least affected

 

According to the survey, the crop least affected by the drought was winter barley, as the crop had already filled its grains and senesced by the time the drought took hold. Average yields of 7.7t/ha were five per cent up on 2017 and two per cent up on the five-year average. Spring barley yields averaged 5.6t/ha, five per cent lower than in 2017 and 10 per cent below the five-year average.

 

Winter oilseed rape averaged 3.4t/ha, compared to 3.7t/ha in 2017, with the crops struggling to maintain the number of seeds set per pod which limited yield potential. Bean yields dropped by around 30 per cent with the drought conditions hindering seed fill and also affecting quality.

 

To read the full results of the yield survey visit: www.struttandparker.com/knowledge-and-research/strutt-parker-yield-results-harvest-2018

 

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