Farmers Guradian
Topics
Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

DataHub

DataHub

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Auction Finder

Auction Finder

British Farming Awards

British Farming Awards

CropTec

CropTec

LAMMA 2019

LAMMA 2019

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days or subscribe for unlimited access.

Subscribe | Register

The battle against cocaine farming: How UK researchers are getting involved

Researchers from Scotland’s Rural College have been awarded more than £122,000 for a project that will help the Colombian government in its war against cocaine farming.

Share This

The battle against cocaine farming: How UK researchers are getting involved

Coca, the raw material used in cocaine, has long been the major source of employment and cash payments for rural farmers who would otherwise struggle to support their families and sustain life in rural Columbia.

 

Professor Andrew Barnes of SRUC’s Land Economy Research Department is involved in projects that help these farmers into clean and sustainable crop farming and developing heat-tolerance in bean varieties capable of replacing the coca plant.

 

But replacing the coca crop is not without its challenges.

 

The famers face the issue of trying to get bulkier new crops to the market over difficult terrain with less accessible roads.

 

Breaking the established relationship that the farmers have with cocaine dealers who come directly to their farms to collect the coca is also problematic to say the least.


Read More

Bovine TB: The enemy at Scotland's gates - Q&A Bovine TB: The enemy at Scotland's gates - Q&A
Farmers could face huge fines as new data protection rules come into play Farmers could face huge fines as new data protection rules come into play

The Columbian government has put initiatives in place to support legal agriculture schemes with the aim of eradicating coca completely.

 

This includes giving rural farmers training and support for alternative crop growing options as well as paying them a subsidy as a reward for not producing coca plants.

 

Prof Barnes’s input will include field work in Columbia.

 

It will be carried out as a one-year pilot, but could be extended by a further two years if it proves successful.

 

The project is to be funded UK Newton Research Fund and will work in collaboration with the Centre of International Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), and the universities of Reading, Leeds and Bristol.

TwitterFacebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.

Most Recent

Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS