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Water treatment technology to improve calf health on trial

Investment has been doubled for further tests on a new water treatment technology, which claims it could improve calf health and therefore reduce the need for antibiotic treatments.

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A trial ongoing for the past year at Bridgwater and Taunton College, is now set to continue thanks to additional monies from water enhancing technology business, WET Group.

 

Initial tests were carried out on water fed to 50 calves, and found that the potentially harmful pathogens seen in untreated water samples were removed when it was treated using the new Guided Enhanced Membrane (G.E.M) system from the WET group, subsequently reducing bacterial growth in the water.

 

Ian Tremain, agriculture innovation manager at Bridgwater and Taunton College, was ‘highly impressed’ with the initial trials.

He said: “The trials show there is potential for farmers to deliver healthier calves, with a reduced requirement for antibiotic treatment, ultimately higher yields and increased profitability from their dairy herd.

 

“It also shows that, as farmers, we can still improve methods by taking a methodical, scientific approach and investing in the right technology.”

 

Simon Fry of the WET group added: "The findings from the initial tests were significant and this is why WET is to invest in further trials to provide 100 per cent validation of its G.E.M.

 

"We have been careful with the initial test conditions, we now need to replicate them and prove to our British farmers that using water that has been properly cleansed, filtered and enhanced when mixed with feed could improve the lives and quality of livestock."

 

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