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Nitrogen fertiliser demand to be higher than last year

Merchant Gleadell has recently imported 26,000t of Urea fertiliser into the UK.

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Nitrogen fertiliser demand to be higher than last year

Demand was expected to rise above last year’s levels for urea fertiliser across the UK from now into the early spring, but stocks were expected to remain tight.

 

One of the largest cargoes of urea fertiliser to arrive in the UK this season has been unloaded at ABP’s Port of Immingham, aboard the MV Montrose originating from Egypt.

 

Forecast

 

Calum Findlay, fertiliser manager at Gleadell, the merchant which imported the 26,000-tonne shipment, said although the market was running behind last year, autumn arable plantings were forecast to be at or above last year’s levels.


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“This, together with a likely increased focus on early forage production following the 2018 summer drought, means demand from now into spring 2019 is likely to be higher than last year."

 

He said on-farm interest was increasing, while importers were finding it difficult to buy at competitive levels due to a firm global market.

 

This market was driven by stricter environmental legislation in China, firm Asian demand and rising prices in Brazil.

 

Mr Findlay added: “There appears to be enough support for global pricing to keep edging higher and there are no signs of any downward pressure until at least the second quarter of 2019 and beyond.”

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