Farmers Guardian
News
Word ‘milk’ banned for use in branding of plant-based products

Word ‘milk’ banned for use in branding of plant-based products

This Is Agriculture - Sponsored

This Is Agriculture - Sponsored

DataHub

DataHub

Auction Finder

Auction Finder

LAMMA 2020

LAMMA 2020

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days or subscribe for unlimited access.

Subscribe | Register

Police ‘finally making headway’ on changing farm dog attack laws in UK

North Wales Police are ‘finally making headway’ on tasking the Government to change the laws around livestock worrying.

TwitterFacebook
Share This

Police ‘finally making headway’ on changing UK dog attack laws #FGTakeTheLead

Police in the UK currently have no legal requirement to report livestock attacks – but the North Wales rural crime team (RCT) is working alongside four other rural forces to make the law ‘fit for purpose in 2019’.

 

Rob Taylor, North Wales RCT, said although farmers had gained more confidence in the team and were beginning to report incidents as they happened, the Dogs (Protection of Livestock) Act 1953 should be scrutinised.

 

Farmers Guardian has been working with North Wales Police and other key industry stakeholders to toughen up the law as part of its Take the Lead campaign.


Read More

British police dealt with more than 1,100 dog attacks on sheep in 2018British police dealt with more than 1,100 dog attacks on sheep in 2018
Farmer calls for respect after 15 'sickening' dog attacks inside four monthsFarmer calls for respect after 15 'sickening' dog attacks inside four months
Sheep found with 'horrendous, gory injuries' after suspected dog attackSheep found with 'horrendous, gory injuries' after suspected dog attack
Walkers accuse council and farmers of ‘fake’ dog attacks and sheep deathsWalkers accuse council and farmers of ‘fake’ dog attacks and sheep deaths

The Act is currently not applicable to attacks where incidents occur outside a farmer’s field, for example on roads, and police do not have the power of seizure, the power to obtain DNA or the power to force dog owners whose pets have attacked livestock to report the incident.

 

Mr Taylor said: “I am a strong believer things do not change until the law comes in. MPs are beginning to realise this is a huge issue for police, for farmers and for dog owners.”

 

The issue was debated in Westminster last week following Mr Taylor’s objection to Defra’s ‘resolution’ that Section 3 offences of the Dangerous Dogs Act (DDA) could be applied in the instance of livestock attacks without a person being present.

 

Consultation

Mr Taylor, however, said this was not the case and the police were still in consultation with the Crown Prosecution Service.

He doubted if the DDA could even be used.

 

It came as the team was forced to deal with another attack when six pregnant ewes were killed by dogs in Cerrigydrudion, Conwy, on Saturday (February 9).

 

Neil Parish, chairman of the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Select Committee, told the Westminster meeting: “It is something we have really got to sort out one way or another as it is a really serious matter.”

TwitterFacebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.

Most Recent

Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS