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Police investigation launched after farmer killed while baling silage

A police investigation has been launched after a farmer was killed in an incident while baling silage.

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Police investigation launched after farmer killed while baling silage #FarmSafety

The victim, named locally as 67-year-old Caldwell Moore, is thought to have fallen between the bales as he was working at the farm in Ardstraw, Co Tyrone over the weekend.

 

The Health and Safety Executive (HSENI) said: "HSENI are aware of a fatality on a farm in the Ardstraw area and are investigating the circumstances.

 

"Our sympathy is with the man’s family at this most difficult time."


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"A post-mortem examination is due to take place to determine the cause of death," police said.

 

"However, this death is not being treated as suspicious at this time."

 

Local DUP councillor Allan Bresland told the Belfast Telegraph: "They would be a very highly respected family in the area.

 

"Everybody’s thoughts are with the family."

 

Mr Moore is survived by his wife Vivienne, children Andrew, Heather, Carolyn and Lorraine, and grandchildren Adam, Josh and Charlie.

During Farm Safety Week earlier this year, farmers were encouraged to take responsiblity in farm safety and were urged to be more aware.

 

“Over the past five years we have asked farmers to stop and think,” Stephanie Berkeley of the Farm Safety Foundation said.

 

“We can continue to make powerful and emotive films and offer advice but we cannot do one thing. We cannot make farmers change their attitude.

 

“Only they can make that change. They have to want to change; they have to decide to change; they have to play their part and they have to take responsibility.”

 

Ms Berkeley said another big factor was the ‘health, agility and stubbornness’ of older farmers, something which this year accounted for 48 per cent of agricultural deaths.

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