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Police issue 'key messages' to farmers after another walker trampled to death by cattle

Farmers have been reminded to keep cows with young calves in fields without public access after a walker was trampled to death by cattle.

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Warning issued to British public after another walker trampled to death by cattle #FarmSafety

Hilary Adair, 87, was knocked unconscious and suffered multiple head and facial injuries when she was attacked by cows grazing on Lynchmere Common while she was out walking on January 7.

 

She later died in hospital from her injuries.

 

A South East Coast Ambulance spokesman said: “Ambulance crews attended the scene following reports at around 11.30am that a woman had been trampled by cows.

 

“We were joined at the scene by the air ambulance service. The woman, who suffered serious injuries, was treated at the scene before being airlifted to St George’s Hospital, Tooting.”


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It is understood she had her face and neck trampled on by the cows.

 

Lynchmere Society president Michael Tibbs told the Haslemere Herald: “Hilary was very involved with the society and very supportive.

 

“We are all shocked. She is the last person I would have expected something like this to happen to. She knew the common intimately and walked there almost every day.”

 

A spokesman for Lynchmere Community Grazing said: “Together with the community in Lynchmere and Hammer we are shocked and saddened by what has happened. We are in touch with the family and our hearts go out to them.

 

“Ten Belted Galloway cattle were involved in a serious incident at Lynchmere Common on January 7.

 

“We would like to thank the emergency services and our neighbours for all they did.

 

“After assisting the emergency services we moved the cattle off the common, to a field without public access.

 

“We are looking into what happened. The same cattle have been on Lynchmere Common for over four years and we take walkers’ safety very seriously.

 

"We always advise walkers to keep their dogs under close control especially around livestock.”

Sussex Police has issued a number of ’key messages’ for farmers:

 

• Cows with young calves should be kept in fields without public access.

 

• Members of the public are unlikely to understand cattle behaviour. Consider ways in which animals can be segregated from rights of way with physical means such as temporary fencing

 

• Remove or cull animals that show signs of aggression. Keep ‘flighty’ animals in fields with no public access.

 

• Check that paths are clearly marked and that fences are secure and well maintained. Site feed locations and troughs away from paths and stiles.

 

• Consider the nature of the cattle you put in fields with public access. Take account of the age of animals, the presence of calves and the influence of changing conditions, like weather and increased footfall at holiday times.

 

• You should judge animal behaviour when members of the public are present, especially if they are walking dogs or with children. Animals showing signs of aggression or distress should be moved to alternative fields.

 

• Display signs when a bull is present.

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