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Recycling Christmas dinner leftovers could power a house for 57 years

Wasted Christmas sprouts could power a home for 3 years



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Recycling Christmas dinner leftovers could power a house for 57 years

Recycling Christmas leftovers into energy, rather than sending to landfill, could power an average medium sized house for 57 years, according to anaerobic digestion (AD) plant operator ReFood.

 

ReFood said around 1,315 tonnes of turkey would be thrown away this Christmas. AD breaks food down into natural biogas, which can be turned into energy and used to power homes, factories and offices.


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Food waste

Turkey

The UK throws away 1,315 tonnes

Could power a house for 23.6 years


Sprouts

The UK throws away 172 tonnes

Could power a house for 3 years


Roast Potatoes

The UK throws away 848 tonnes

Could power a house for 15.2 years


Mince Pies

The UK throws away 375 tonnes

Could power a house for 6.7 years


Christmas Pudding

The UK throws away 72 tonnes

Could power a house for 1.3 years

More than one third of sprouts in the UK were produced for Christmas, but one quarter of the population claimed to ‘hate’ the vegetable.

 

Philip Simpson, commercial director at ReFood, said sprouts 'gas-producing qualities' could actually be a good thing.

 

"Christmas is a time for families coming together, and enjoyment, but over the years, it’s also become a time of waste.

 

Waste

 

"Obviously the first priority is to eliminate waste, and address the needs of food charities.

 

"But when that’s not possible, we need to have a more sustainable attitude to dealing with this waste problem."

 

Mr Simpson said the cost of sending food waste to landfill could be 46 per cent higher than recycling it.

 

"Some businesses still don’t realise that sending food waste to landfill, not only impacts the environment, but is also costly and outdated."

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