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RSPCA backs livestock worrying campaign

The animal welfare charity is working alongside industry campaigners to raise awareness of dog attacks on livestock and the devastation they cause.


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Farmers have been encouraged to use signs to warn dog walkers
Farmers have been encouraged to use signs to warn dog walkers

The RSPCA has once again thrown its weight behind Farmers Guardian’s Take the Lead campaign by issuing guidance to dog owners about the danger their pets can cause to livestock.

 

As the traditional lambing season approaches, the charity is working alongside FG and National Sheep Association (NSA) to raise awareness among dog walkers.

 

Read more: Farmers deliver hard-hitting message to owners whose dogs attack livestock

 

NSA chief executive Phil Stocker said: “A growing number of our members continue to tell us of some horrendous attacks they have suffered to their livestock.

 

"It is not only the harrowing injuries which out of control dogs have inflicted, but also the losses they have suffered as a result of dogs simply chasing livestock.”

 

RSPCA inspector Tony Woodley warned the gentlest of pets could be a danger to farm animals.

 

He added: “Dog owners should remember they could be prosecuted and their dog could be shot dead if they are caught worrying sheep.”

 

Farmers Guardian’s Take the Lead campaign was launched two years ago to educate the public about the impact of dog attacks on livestock.

 

FG’s latest research shows attacks have continued to rise, with more than 2,000 attacks reported to police in the last two years.

 

The initiative, which urges people to keep their dogs on a lead when walking around farm animals, has been supported by leading farming and rural organisations including the National Sheep Association (NSA) and the British Veterinary Association (BVA).

 

More than 45,000 Take the Lead campaign signs warning walkers about the consequences of livestock worrying have been nailed to fence posts around Britain.

 


Read More

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Farmer leaves savaged sheep on path to highlight dog attacks Farmer leaves savaged sheep on path to highlight dog attacks
Farmer tells of horrific dog attack on sheep Farmer tells of horrific dog attack on sheep
Police reiterate importance of reporting dog attacks on livestock Police reiterate importance of reporting dog attacks on livestock


signs
Tips for dog owners:
  • Watch for signs warning of livestock and keep your dog on a lead around farm animals and in areas you suspect animals may be grazing, or avoid them completely.
  • If your dog chases sheep, report it to the farmer even if there is no apparent injury as the stress of worrying by dogs can cause sheep to die and pregnant ewes to miscarry their lambs
  • Make sure your dog is wormed regularly and pick up it’s mess to stop diseases spreading to livestock
  • Visit www.nationalsheep.org.uk/dog-owners and www.rspca.org.uk/adviceandwelfare/pets/dogs to learn more about responsible dog ownership.
Tips for farmers:
  • Put up signs warning dog owners where livestock are grazing. To request signs send a stamped, self-addressed A4 envelope to: FG Take the Lead, Farmers Guardian, Unit 4, Fulwood Business Park, Preston, Lancashire, PR2 9NZ.
  • Keep fencing in good repair to ensure sheep don’t stray from the area they should be in.
  • Always report an incident, however minor, to the police. Lack of reporting makes it difficult to raise awareness of the severity of the problem.
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