Farmers Guardian
News
Word ‘milk’ banned for use in branding of plant-based products

Word ‘milk’ banned for use in branding of plant-based products

This Is Agriculture - Sponsored

This Is Agriculture - Sponsored

DataHub

DataHub

Auction Finder

Auction Finder

LAMMA 2020

LAMMA 2020

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days or subscribe for unlimited access.

Subscribe | Register

Scottish Gov introduces mandatory CCTV for all parts of abattoirs

The move has apparently been backed by the vast majority of respondents to a recent government consultation although questions have been raised about the cost of new equipment.

Share This

Scottish gov introduces mandatory CCTV for all parts of abattoirs where live animals are present

Scottish Government is to bring forward legislation this year requiring abattoirs to record on closed circuit television (CCTV) all areas where live animals are present.

 

The move has apparently been backed by the vast majority of respondents to a recent government consultation although questions have been raised about the cost of new equipment.

 

Minister for Rural Affairs and the Natural Environment Mairi Gougeon said: “More than eight out of 10 slaughterhouses in Scotland have already installed CCTV coverage in their premises voluntarily, and over 95 per cent of all animals slaughtered in Scotland are covered by some form of CCTV.


Read More

‘Small abattoirs must be recognised as a public good in the UK’‘Small abattoirs must be recognised as a public good in the UK’
Vets not needed in small abattoirs, says industry bodyVets not needed in small abattoirs, says industry body
Westminster told more urgency needed to prepare small abattoirs for BrexitWestminster told more urgency needed to prepare small abattoirs for Brexit

“However, the standards of that coverage can differ from location to location.

 

“We are pleased that so many respondents to our consultation backed our proposals to make this compulsory.

 

“It was important also to consider the financial implications of such a move for industry, and whether other options might be available to improve animal welfare.”

 

The Scottish Association of Meat Wholesalers (SAMW), whose members operate the majority of the abattoirs in the country, said while it welcomed the announcement, the move may require some existing CCTV systems to be upgraded or completely replaced.

 

Footage

It therefore called for confirmation from Ms Gougeon of grant support to meet any additional cost burdens, similar to that in Wales.

 

A spokesperson said: "Currently, over 95 per cent of animals processed in Scotland go through meat plants which use CCTV, and have done so for several years.

“This runs alongside the industry’s open and transparent approach with the veterinary authorities and follows the strict welfare controls which are monitored by Food Standards Scotland (FSS).

 

“We already have an agreed protocol with FFS to enable appropriately trained veterinary officers to have direct access to in-plant CCTV systems.

 

“This is an important point as all CCTV footage needs to be viewed and understood by trained observers who are fully conversant with in-plant procedures and operating standards.

 

“As we have seen with VAR in football, video images are open to many interpretations when viewed by untrained and ill-informed observers.”

British Veterinary Association (BVA) Scottish branch president Melissa Donald said the move was ‘a huge win’ for animal welfare, suggesting it would help keep welfare standards high at all stages of the supply chain.

 

She said: “Official Veterinarians in Scottish abattoirs will be able to use CCTV as a complement to their welfare monitoring and also have unrestricted access to footage so that they can identify and resolve any breaches in regulation effectively.

 

“Now that Scotland has taken this important step, we hope that governments in Wales and Northern Ireland will follow suit and explore the merits of future legislation for animal welfare, public health, food safety and future trade.”

TwitterFacebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.

Most Recent

Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS