Farmers Guardian
News
Word ‘milk’ banned for use in branding of plant-based products

Word ‘milk’ banned for use in branding of plant-based products

This Is Agriculture - Sponsored

This Is Agriculture - Sponsored

DataHub

DataHub

Auction Finder

Auction Finder

LAMMA 2020

LAMMA 2020

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days or subscribe for unlimited access.

Subscribe | Register

Sheep special: Tips on managing young ewes

Looking after young ewes in your flock will reduce culling and improve productivity according to Dr Liz Genever, AHDB senior beef and lamb specialist.

TwitterFacebook
Share This

Sheep special: Tips on managing young ewes #HandyHints

She says:“Whether they are ewe lambs or shearlings they are lambing for the first time so their udders are still developing,” she said.

 

“This means there is a high risk of teat lesions as lambs may take longer to feed if milk yield is reduced and these may become infected. The skin of the teats will not have become hardened and it is the first time the sheep will have been exposed to certain bacteria.”

 

The risk of mastitis is increased by underfeeding protein and energy in pregnancy and lactation, low body condition score and poor hygiene.

 

Dr Genever says ewe lambs and in some cases shearling are better only rearing one lamb.


Read More

Farm tips: Keeping your chainsaws in top conditionFarm tips: Keeping your chainsaws in top condition
GRAPHIC WARNING: Outrage as sheep faces ripped off in brutal dog attackGRAPHIC WARNING: Outrage as sheep faces ripped off in brutal dog attack
Increasing demand for ewes and lambs despite poor weatherIncreasing demand for ewes and lambs despite poor weather
Lleyns at heart of sheep breeding enterpriseLleyns at heart of sheep breeding enterprise
Sheep special: Guide to controlling worms in your flockSheep special: Guide to controlling worms in your flock

“If they are struggling to rear twins you have the option of taking one off. It is a question of pushing them at this stage and risking losing them from the flock earlier or looking after them a bit more with the aim of them lasting longer."

 

Dr Genever advises ewe lambs should be 60 per cent of mature body weight at first mating, 70 per cent at first lambing, 80 per cent at second mating and at the third mating 100 per cent mature weight.

 

She says: “In order to do this you have to know what is the mature weight for a ewe in your flock make sure you are tupping ewe lambs at optimum weight.

“Feed ewe lambs to grow up to six weeks before lambing and then feed for maintenance in the last six weeks of pregnancy.

 

"In lactation ewe lambs should be fed 20 per cent more than mature ewes with the same litter size. Shearlings should be fed 10 per cent more energy and protein pre lambing and in lactation than mature ewes.

 

“If possible manage young ewes as a separate group as it will make it easier to prioritise them.

 

"Monitor body condition score of ewes and lamb weights and if necessary creep lambs to reduce risk of mastitis and teat lesions and wean early to allow ewes to recover before next mating.”

TwitterFacebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.

Most Recent

Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS