Farmers Guradian
Topics
Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Arable Farming Magazine

Arable Farming Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

British Farming Awards

CropTec

LAMMA 2019

New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now
Login or Register
New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now
New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days or subscribe for unlimited access.

Subscribe | Register

Stopping killing people has to be our priority, NFU Council told

‘Stopping killing people has to be our number one priority’, NFU Council was told this week as the Farm Safety Partnership pledged to halve the rate of on-farm deaths over the next five years.


Lauren   Dean

TwitterFacebook
Lauren   Dean
TwitterFacebook
Share This

Stopping killing people has to be our priority, NFU Council told #FarmSafety

The comments were made by NFU vice-president Stuart Roberts, who is leading the charge for change as newly-appointed chairman of a re-energised FSP.

 

According to current figures, about 30 people die every year on UK farms as a result of poor health and safety.

 

The ultimate goal of the FSP is to stop all on-farm deaths.

 

“At the current rate of reduction, it would take us 30 years to catch up with construction and achieve the safety levels that sector is seeing,” Mr Roberts told an earlier meeting of the FSP.


Read More

Farmer in his forties dies after incident on farm Farmer in his forties dies after incident on farm
From the editor: What will it take to change farming’s safety record? From the editor: What will it take to change farming’s safety record?
Man, 58, dies on farm after incident involving cattle Man, 58, dies on farm after incident involving cattle

“To do this the FSP has to up the ante. We must be bold and ambitious and push the farming industry to enact change quickly.”

 

Ten marts across Ireland have already banned farmers from freely moving among cattle to help reduce accidents.

 

And in Scotland, farmers are being urged not to ‘leave it to FATE’ in an FSP Scotland campaign focusing on falls, animals, transport and equipment.

 

The fresh safety push came as research by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) showed farmers who admitted to cutting corners on the job were likely to blame for the industry’s lax safety record.

 

The study found 83 per cent of farmers agreed working on a farm would inherently be risky, but 18 per cent – typically the over-65s – categorised themselves as risk takers.

54 per cent of those ‘risk takers’ admitted to doing things they knew were risky and 26 per cent said they did things they knew could get them seriously injured or killed.

 

Cost cutting

A further 40 per cent said they were ‘excited’ when they did not know what would happen.

 

Dr Amy Irwin of the University of Aberdeen, who published a risk-based study earlier this month, suggested farmers tended to take risks because of the surrounding environment where hazards and associated risks were ‘a consistent feature which farmers feel they must adapt to’.

 

“Farmers also face financial hardships, which can lead to cost cutting such as reducing staff numbers and not fitting safety equipment,” she said. “And the social environment of growing up on a farm, where children frequently see corner cutting and risk-taking, can lead to risk-taking behaviour being normalised in adulthood.”

 

The FSP, which Farmers Guardian is a member of, will run a series of initiatives over the coming year looking at child safety on farms, falls from height, machinery threats and working with livestock.

 

Farmers Guardian Jobs

Farmers Guardian Jobs

It is estimated a third of the global population work in agriculture - making it the single largest employer in the world.


Check out the Farmers Guardian Jobs board for the latest vacancies from this vast and varied industry.

 

Click here to browse our jobs!

TwitterFacebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.

Most Recent

Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS