Farmers Guradian
Topics
Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

DataHub

DataHub

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Auction Finder

Auction Finder

British Farming Awards

British Farming Awards

CropTec

CropTec

LAMMA 2019

LAMMA 2019

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days or subscribe for unlimited access.

Subscribe | Register

Teat necrosis proves more common than once thought

Teat necrosis in dairy cattle is being reported up and down the country.


Laura   Bowyer

TwitterFacebook
Laura   Bowyer
TwitterFacebook

When it comes to teat necrosis, the cause, number of cases and its risk factors are all unknown, although anecdotally 20 per cent of heifers are affected in some herds, but there are no known treatments for the disease.


Not being geographically contained as perhaps it was once thought, the condition has been reported in areas of the country as far flung as the Shetland Isles, West Wales and Essex.


As the cause of the disease is currently unknown, research into the condition is required and AHDB Dairy and the University of Liverpool are working together in an attempt to find answers.


Lesions are confined to the skin and do not directly cause mastitis, although the cow may not milk out fully on the affected quarter, increasing the risk of mastitis. Some try to save this quarter for the next lactation.


There is some debate whether the bacteria involved are closely related to that of digital dermatitis, but Hayley Crosby-Durrani, who is focusing her PhD on the condition, says the microbiology and pathology have not been studied.


The lack of microbiological studies is also a stumbling block when it comes to treating the condition, as without being able to identify the relevant bacteria, then it cannot be treated.


As part of her PhD work, Mrs Crosby-Durrani has been visiting farms with reported cases of the disease, taking samples of the lesions, but also the environment, such as the bedding and teatcup liners.


She says: “We are trying to look at the samples and see if there is a common bacteria, fungus or infection between the cases which will then enable us to look to prevent, treat and control the problem.


“Currently, a whole manner of different treatments are being used, and I would say these see a maximum 50 per cent success rate, with some causing no effect at all. Herds seem to only get one or two cases but there is concern it might be infectious.”

 

More information

If you have a suspected case of teat necrosis please get in touch with Hayley Crosby-Durrani on 07765 456 529, or via email on hcrosby@liverpool.ac.uk. For updates and further information please visit www.liverpool.ac.uk/BovineITN

What does it look like?

  • A dry, dark red to black area on the skin at the base of the teat
  • Presents itself at the base of the teat where it joins the udder and turns a red and black colour in a sharp line between affected and non-affected areas
  • Sometimes extending down the teat towards its end and up on the skin of the udder
  • The animal may remove its own teats through licking
  • It can be confused for herpes mammillitis, but it is not believed to be the same disease
TwitterFacebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.

Most Recent

Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS