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Tissue sampling at birth to improve traceability and long-term performance

All Stabiliser cattle will be identified and tissue sampled at birth in a bid to improve traceability and long-term performance.

 

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Tissue sampling at birth to improve traceability and long-term performance

Seth Wareing, Stabiliser business development manager, says tissue sampling will play a major role in the development of the breed.

 

He explains: “All Stabiliser cattle will be tagged using the Caisley Geno Tag at birth which means we will be able to take a DNA sample from every animal at the point of tagging.

 

“The parentage of all pedigree cattle will be confirmed and all breeding animals will have a parentage test performed using the tissue sample before they are sold. We will keep samples from all other animals so they can be tested later if required.”

 

Confidence

 

Mr Wareing says as a breeding company selling high performance breeding stock, it is very important for customers to be confident the animals they buy are fully traceable.

 

“We already run tests for parentage checks, the horned gene and coat colour. By taking tissue samples of all calves at birth, this process will be much more efficient.”

 

He believes there is also the potential to develop genomics for a range of traits and could open up considerable opportunities for the Stabiliser breed in the future.

 

Traceability

 

“We are confident that with access to DNA samples from all animals in the breed, we will be able to provide the highest level of traceability, for example being able to genetically link a steak on the plate back to the sample taken when the animal was just a week old.

 

“This will bring tremendous peace of mind, providing a secure supply chain with 100 per cent traceability. We intend to be at the forefront of the application of genomic information in beef production, based on the establishment of tissue sampling across the entire breed.”

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