Farmers Guardian
News
Word ‘milk’ banned for use in branding of plant-based products

Word ‘milk’ banned for use in branding of plant-based products

This Is Agriculture - Sponsored

This Is Agriculture - Sponsored

DataHub

DataHub

Auction Finder

Auction Finder

LAMMA 2020

LAMMA 2020

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days or subscribe for unlimited access.

Subscribe | Register

View From The Hill: President Trump compensates US farmers

US farmers have been granted £3.65 billion in compensation to offset direct loss of income due to global retaliation for tariffs imposed by the Trump administration, writes John Wilkes.

TwitterFacebook
Share This

View From The Hill: President Trump compensates US farmers

This allocation is part of a £9.3bn trade mitigation package.

 

The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Market Facilitation Programme will administer the payout.

 

Big winners are soybean farmers with £2.82bn (£60/tonne) and the pork industry at £225.5 million (£6.22/head).

 

Soybean growers can soon expect 50 per cent payment on the 2018 crop. Remaining remuneration is dependent upon market volatility later in the year.

 

Others supported by the £3.65bn programme include cotton, sorghum, dairy, wheat and corn (maize).


Read More

View from the Hill: John Wilkes, Washington - 'All in the genes for US agriculture'View from the Hill: John Wilkes, Washington - 'All in the genes for US agriculture'
VIEW FROM THE HILL: UK can learn from US on tackling ag extremistsVIEW FROM THE HILL: UK can learn from US on tackling ag extremists
VIEW FROM THE HILL: UK's 'lack of resources' holding up trade dealVIEW FROM THE HILL: UK's 'lack of resources' holding up trade deal
View From The Hill: US farmers hoping for UK/EU separation after BrexitView From The Hill: US farmers hoping for UK/EU separation after Brexit

Farmers’ individual entitlement for harvested crops is £93,000. An applicant’s gross farm income must not exceed £700,000/annum.

 

After October 1, USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service has authority to ‘buy back’ US farm produce of £958m. Farm commodities purchased appear in nutritional programmes that support low-income American families.

 

The likelihood is £432m for American pork, £66m for dairy products and £11.5m for beef. A range of 25 fruits and vegetables is also underwritten.

 

A separate tranche of £155m is destined for the Agricultural Trade Programme. Funds can be used for advertising, PR, market research and trade fair attendance and/or promotion. The agriculture industry, including fish and forestry, is eligible.

 

American soybean and hog farmers are enthusiastic; dairy, wheat and corn producers less so. American growers are due £4/t in compensation for wheat and £0.39/t for corn.

Understandably, there is mixed reaction from farm groups about payment levels. US agriculture is under pressure with net farm income in 2018 set to equal 2016 levels; the lowest since 2002.

 

A spokesperson for the National Association of Wheat Growers (NAWG) said: “The ongoing trade war will cause a $0.75/bushel [£21/t] decrease and a reduction in global wheat production.

 

“NAWG appreciates the administration’s steps to hold China accountable for unfair trade practices, but tariffs and the subsequent self-inflicted need to provide aid are not the answer. Farmers across the country want ‘trade, not aid’, especially wheat growers.”

 

The geography of agricultural sector recipients of the bulk of compensation may be coincidental.

 

However, most US soybean and pork producers are located primarily in key states President Trump won in 2016.

 

With the upcoming mid-term elections, retention of Republican House seats in these states is vital for the President and the Republican Party.

TwitterFacebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.

Most Recent

Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS