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Environmental and economic case for growing miscanthus put forward at agri-renewables event

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A growing demand for renewable energy crops and the environmental benefits associated with miscanthus has improved its viability as a commercial crop according to speakers at the agri-renewables event.

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Miscanthus offers economic and environmental benefits #renewableenergy #arable

The verdict of 200 global leaders agreeing in Paris that the reduction of carbon emissions is crucial in tackling the rise in global temperatures, is good news for the renewable energy industry.

 

Since miscanthus cropping area makes up 6 percent of the area grown for renewable energy, it is a key contributor to lowering carbon emissions.

 

Not only that, but recent academic research has suggested, there are a number of environmental benefits of putting 5 per cent of UK lower grade land into miscanthus production.

 

Speaking at the agri-renewables event, George Robinson, managing director of Terravesta said: “Miscanthus requires minimum inputs and typically delivers high annual yields, currently delivering 12- 18 tonnes per hectare from well-established crops.”

 

Given the volatility in cereal prices and the need to maximise returns from arable land, miscanthus could prove a viable solution for many farmers, particularly those farming lower grade land.

 

Mr Robinson said: “As well as the environmental benefits attributed to growing miscanthus, there’s a good financial case for it, and it can help boost food production on farm.

 

“Growing this perennial energy crop offers greater security of high annual net margin than almost any other crop, while reducing working capital and overhead costs.”

 

See also: Farmers urged to consider straw for renewable energy

 

 

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