FG BUY&SELL        FARMERS WEATHER       ARABLE FARMING        DAIRY FARMER      FARMERS GUARDIAN        AGRIMONEY        OUR EVENTS        MEMBERSHIP BENEFITS        BLOGS        MORE FROM US

You are viewing 1 of your 2 free articles

You’ll need to join us by becoming a member to gain more access.
Already a Member?

Login Join us now

Environmental and economic case for growing miscanthus put forward at agri-renewables event

News

A growing demand for renewable energy crops and the environmental benefits associated with miscanthus has improved its viability as a commercial crop according to speakers at the agri-renewables event.

Twitter Facebook
Share This

Miscanthus offers economic and environmental benefits #renewableenergy #arable

The verdict of 200 global leaders agreeing in Paris that the reduction of carbon emissions is crucial in tackling the rise in global temperatures, is good news for the renewable energy industry.

 

Since miscanthus cropping area makes up 6 percent of the area grown for renewable energy, it is a key contributor to lowering carbon emissions.

 

Not only that, but recent academic research has suggested, there are a number of environmental benefits of putting 5 per cent of UK lower grade land into miscanthus production.

 

Speaking at the agri-renewables event, George Robinson, managing director of Terravesta said: “Miscanthus requires minimum inputs and typically delivers high annual yields, currently delivering 12- 18 tonnes per hectare from well-established crops.”

 

Given the volatility in cereal prices and the need to maximise returns from arable land, miscanthus could prove a viable solution for many farmers, particularly those farming lower grade land.

 

Mr Robinson said: “As well as the environmental benefits attributed to growing miscanthus, there’s a good financial case for it, and it can help boost food production on farm.

 

“Growing this perennial energy crop offers greater security of high annual net margin than almost any other crop, while reducing working capital and overhead costs.”

 

See also: Farmers urged to consider straw for renewable energy

 

 

Twitter Facebook
Rating (0 vote/s)
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.

More News

EU Referendum, one year on: An in-depth look at the sugar sector

Michael Sly, NFU sugar board chairman, continues FG’s week-long mini-series exploring what has changed for farming in the twelve months since the EU referendum.

Great Repeal Bill risks loss of 97 per cent of herbicides used by farmers

Fears are growing that plans to ‘lift and shift’ EU regulations into UK law through the Great Repeal Bill could see farmers lose up to 97 per cent of the herbicides they currently use.

EU Referendum, one year on: An in-depth look at the arable sector

Mike Hambly, NFU crops board chairman, continues FG’s week-long mini-series exploring what has changed for farming in the twelve months since the EU referendum.

Outbreaks of black-grass in ‘new’ areas will be resistant

Black-grass appearing for the first time on farms which have not previously experienced it will almost certainly be resistant to herbicides, according to leading expert Stephen Moss.

Cereals 2017: Chasing the world wheat yield record

More than a quarter of a century of world wheat record-holding experience was brought together by Agrii at Cereals, with the aim of comparing notes and planning to push performance beyond the 17t/ha (6.9t/acre) mark.
FG Insight and FGInsight.com are trademarks of Briefing Media Ltd.
Farmers Guardian and FarmersGuardian.com are trademarks of Farmers Guardian Ltd, a subsidiary of Briefing Media Ltd.
All material published on FGInsight.com and FarmersGuardian.com is copyrighted © 2016 by Briefing Media Limited. All rights reserved.
RSS news feeds