Farmers Guradian
Topics
Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Arable Farming Magazine

Arable Farming Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

British Farming Awards

CropTec

LAMMA 2018

New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now
Login or Register
New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now
New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days
Already a Member?

Login | Join us now

Welsh farmers facing TB compensation cuts for 'risky practices'

Deputy Food and Farming Minister Rebecca Evans confirmed the introduction of new legislation to ‘penalise people who are undertaking risky practices which can contribute to the spread of TB’.
Farmers could see TB compensation cut under a range of circumstances
Farmers could see TB compensation cut under a range of circumstances

Farmers in Wales will see compensation payments for bovine TB reactors slashed under a range of circumstances, including bringing animals into restricted herds in full compliance with TB rules.

 

Deputy Food and Farming Minister Rebecca Evans confirmed the introduction of new legislation to ‘penalise people who are undertaking risky practices which can contribute to the spread of TB’ on Monday.

 

This followed a consultation on proposals to emend various elements of Wales’ TB regulations.

 

Mrs Evans had previously decided against following England in introducing a table valuation compensation system but said she was enhancing the current system of individual on-farm valuations.

 

Already compensation payments are deducted by up to 95 per cent in certain circumstances such as a failure to TB test animals as required by the law and a failure to comply with the requirements of a Veterinary Improvement Notice.

 

The consultation proposed a whole raft of new circumstances under which compensation could be reduced in a similar, the most significant being where an animal has been slaughtered because of TB after it had been brought in entirely legally, under licence, to a restricted herd.

 

The Welsh Government said: “We feel that this proposal allows the person to restock for business reasons but means they share the financial risk of bringing healthy cattle into herds with a known TB problem.”

 

While the British Veterinary Association welcomed the proposal in its consultation,

Hugely draconian

But NFU Cymru warned reducing compensation to 5 per cent of market value in these circumstances was ‘hugely draconian’ and said it must be accompanied by greater flexibility in the rules governing licensed movements.

 

The Farmers Union of Wales said the proposal could place farmers ’adhering to the conditions of an already restrictive licence in an untenable position financially’.

 

Other situations proposed in the consultation where compensation could be reduced included:

 

  • breaching the conditions set out in the approval of an Approved Finishing Unit
  • moving an animal under movement restrictions without a licence
  • letting an animal under movement restrictions stray
  • interference with the TB test
  • hiding or failing to present an animal for testing, valuation or removal
  • failure to co-operate with the removal of an animal to be slaughtered, delaying it for longer than 10 working days
  • breaching the conditions of an isolation notice or cleansing and disinfection notice
  • feeding unpasteurised milk from a reactor animal to another animal
  • failure to comply with the requirements of a Biosecurity Improvement Notice
  • use of an unauthorised vaccine
  • treating an animal for TB.

 

The compensation reductions will vary depending on whether it is a first or subsequent offence.

 

The new legislation will be drafted over the coming months when the final details will be thrashed out.

 

Mrs Evans said: "In the vast majority of cases full compensation based on market value will continue to be paid.

 

"The new legislation will provide us with the powers to reduce compensation for those people who have broken the rules."

 

 

 

 

 

Twitter Facebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.
Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS