FG BUY&SELL        FARMERS WEATHER       ARABLE FARMING        DAIRY FARMER      FARMERS GUARDIAN        AGRIMONEY        OUR EVENTS        MEMBERSHIP BENEFITS        BLOGS        MORE FROM US
You are here: News > Insights
Search

You are viewing 1 of your 2 free articles

You’ll need to join us by becoming a member to gain more access.
Already a Member?

Login Join us now

A new test for TB claims to raise detection rate

Insights

A new blood and milk test for bovine TB is expected to help improve detection rates and could soon play a major role alongside existing tests in the UK’s fight against the disease.

Twitter Facebook
Alastair Hayton says the new test is likely to pick up earlier infection
Alastair Hayton says the new test is likely to pick up earlier infection
Share This

A new milk blood test claims to be able to raise the detection rate for TB #dairy #TB

The Enferplex test, which detects the presence of a number of different antibodies which are produced by the animal in response to a TB infection, is said to be on the verge of gaining ministerial approval to undergo UK trials and validation.


Once this process goes ahead, it is expected to lead to full EU approval, after which the test could play a significant role in the eradication of TB in the UK.

Positive results

Alastair Hayton, from Synergy Farm Vets, one company spearheading the uptake of the new test, said: “The best scenario is we will have the science completed by early to mid-2016 and then it is a question of how quickly the relevant EU and UK administrations can move, assuming positive results are established.


The new test is unlike the two in current use – the skin test and interferon test – which aim to identify changes at the cell level, known as the cell mediated immune response (CMI).


“Because of its different mode of operation, the new test is likely to detect a different population of infected animals from the current tests and could pick up earlier infection and give more reliable results,” Mr Hayton said. “In particular, it is hoped it will have a value in detecting significantly more infected animals in chronic endemically infected herds and provide the opportunity to clear out these herds more quickly.”

 

Immune response

He said this was because the immune response measured in the existing tests often diminishes as an animal’s infection becomes more long-term and severe. This was said to explain why the skin test was often criticised for failing when it is needed most, as an animal with lesions could be the one which fails to be picked up by the skin test because of its absence of a normal immune response.


However, tests based on antibody detection will not be affected by this phenomenon and should, therefore, still detect these infected animals.


“We are not suggesting we can replace the skin or interferon test but we think we can help farmers fully identify true infection in their herds and thereby reduce the time under restriction,” he said.


The test was also said to have the scope to be used for diagnosing TB in badgers. Its uptake is being driven by Synergy in collaboration with MV Diagnostics in Scotland and the Enfer Group in Ireland.

Twitter Facebook
Rating (0 vote/s)
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.

More Insights

Livestock and vegetables are a good mix for Suffolk farm business

Dorset sheep, pigs and beef cattle play an integral part in the sustainability of intensive vegetable production for one farming enterprise in Suffolk. Jennifer McKenzie reports.

Handy Hints: Tackling weeds in grassland

Keeping on top of grassland weeds can be frustrating. Chloe Palmer seeks the best advice for minimising weed incidence and effective control.

New entrants hatch successful Happy Hen enterprise

First-generation farmers Alaistaire and Fiona Brice started their free-range egg business in 2003 with just 300 hens in a converted pig hut on rented land. Since then they’ve expanded their flock hugely and created a successful brand supplying 740,000 eggs a week to more than 600 retailers across the region. Clemmie Gleeson finds out more.

Tackling lameness brings other benefits for Welsh sheep producer

Using the five-point sheep lameness reduction plan has helped Welsh sheep farmer improve productivity. Farmers Guardian reports.

Apples aid survival of rural village

Village communities are an integral part of farming life and, with many facing their own challenges, one rural village has joined together to help preserve its future. Marie Claire Kidd finds out more.
FG Insight and FGInsight.com are trademarks of Briefing Media Ltd.
Farmers Guardian and FarmersGuardian.com are trademarks of Farmers Guardian Ltd, a subsidiary of Briefing Media Ltd.
All material published on FGInsight.com and FarmersGuardian.com is copyrighted © 2016 by Briefing Media Limited. All rights reserved.
RSS news feeds