FG BUY&SELL        FARMERS WEATHER       ARABLE FARMING        DAIRY FARMER      FARMERS GUARDIAN        AGRIMONEY        OUR EVENTS        MEMBERSHIP BENEFITS        BLOGS        MORE FROM US
You are here: News > Insights
Search

You are viewing 1 of your 2 free articles

You’ll need to join us by becoming a member to gain more access.
Already a Member?

Login Join us now

Arable Farming magazine's November/December 2015 digital edition

Insights

Don’t miss this month’s new look Arable Farming. Take a look at the digital edition today.

Twitter Facebook

A word from the Editor

By the time this issue lands on doormats the bulk of the autumn workload will, hopefully, be complete. Crop establish-ment reports appear on the whole to be good, although slugs and cabbage stem flea beetle have been challenging for some.

 

The focus now is on nurturing and protecting what is in the ground, but already the yield-rob-bers are queuing up. Early phoma pressure in oilseed rape has required action, while black-grass has taken advantage of favourable weather. Sadly some growers are once again faced with the prospect of spraying-off an established winter wheat crop before further costs are incurred.

 

As ever we will need to be well-informed, well-advised and thinking ahead as the new season’s challenges emerge, but I’m pleased to say there will be help, advice and, I am sure, inspiration at this year’s CropTec, which takes place later this month. Don’t miss our event preview on p30-43.

 

It has been a busy time too this autumn in the world of farming politics. Concerns expressed over England’s Countryside Stewardship Scheme, the successor to Entry Level Steward-ship, appear to have materialised into poor up-take. With the new scheme being described variously as being ‘poorly designed’, ‘not fit for purpose’ and ‘burdensome’ and thousands of farms set to exit ELS in 2016, it would seem an early overhaul is needed for the sake of farm businesses and the environment.

 

The volume of noise around ‘Brexit’ and the UK’s in-out EU membership referendum is increasing. Lots of questions, very few answers, but as yet no detail from David Cameron on the criteria upon which he wants to negotiate. What is clear, however, is there will be implications for agriculture, whatever the outcome, and voters in farming must work to ensure their voices are heard.

 

There have been a few news stories of late which have led me to muse on the complex interactions between politics, technology, and legislation. With increasing use of technology comes ever more legislation it seems. Is this inevitable?

 

Will this always be the case and so an increasing burden of rules ands regulations be something we and following generations will have to live with? Or will the way we manage and control our use of technology adapt as technological innovation moves ahead? I don’t have the answers but as I contemplate headlines on GM, privacy and use of drones, genome editng and ‘big data’, to name but a few, it does make you think.

 

Hope to see you at CropTec.

Teresa Rush, Arable Farming editor.

Twitter Facebook
Rating (0 vote/s)
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.

More Insights

User story: Organic matter preservation drives drill choice

After several years of experimentation, one Northumberland farm has settled on a drilling regime which suites its soils and farming principals.

Introducing livestock: Picking the right species

Continuing our series on integrating livestock to an arable rotation, farmers need to decide on the type of stock they are going to introduce, the breed and the intended market.

Spraying better in a busy spring

A long list of spring jobs can leave farmers struggling to prioritise, particularly those with livestock and arable enterprises. Abby Kellett and Marianne Curtis get some tips on maximising spraying efficiency.

On-test: Chafer Interceptor combines best of both worlds

Not wanting to rely only on sales of its trailed sprayers, Chafer is back in the self-propelled market with the development of the Interceptor.

User story: Bogie takes the strain

With operational safety in mind, Ascott Estate has adopted a Meredith Engineering bogie to carry its fertiliser spreader.
FG Insight and FGInsight.com are trademarks of Briefing Media Ltd.
Farmers Guardian and FarmersGuardian.com are trademarks of Farmers Guardian Ltd, a subsidiary of Briefing Media Ltd.
All material published on FGInsight.com and FarmersGuardian.com is copyrighted © 2016 by Briefing Media Limited. All rights reserved.
RSS news feeds