FG BUY&SELL        FARMERS WEATHER       ARABLE FARMING        DAIRY FARMER      FARMERS GUARDIAN        AGRIMONEY        OUR EVENTS        MEMBERSHIP BENEFITS        BLOGS        MORE FROM US

You are viewing 1 of your 2 free articles

You’ll need to join us by becoming a member to gain more access.
Already a Member?

Login Join us now

Eight top tips to create the perfect CV

Insights

Having a great CV is still the best way of catching the eye in the agricultural recruitment market, as Ben Pike found out.

Twitter Facebook
Share This

A good CV can be the deal breaker - do you know how to write the one for you? #job

Bag yourself the perfect job in farming by creating the perfect CV! #job

Everyone knows everyone in farming; that’s what we’re told.

 

For an industry belonging to businesses which largely exist in scantily populated pockets across the UK, it’s extremely well connected.

 

This personal andprofessional network is one of farming’s strengths, but when it comes to getting started in the industry – particularly for those who have no farming background – it is essential to make a good first impression if you want to break through. To get a job on a progressive farm or to work for a company offering services to farmers, having a brilliant curriculum vitae (CV) is paramount.

 

Having a colourful Facebook page, showing your enthusiasm for farming on your Twitter profile or listing your work experience on LinkedIn is not enough. Employers want to know why you will be great – notjust good – atthe job they are recruiting for.

 

Farmers Guardian spoke to a few experts about how farming’s next generation can gain a competitive advantage.

 

Write your CV well

Top CV Tips

  • Corinne Mills, managing director of Personal Career Management, says the CV still plays a huge role in the recruitment process.

 

She wrote You’re Hired! How To Write A Brilliant CV but admits, in a world which is more socially connected than ever before, personalities and profiles on social media and websites, such as LinkedIn are great shop windows for recruiters. But nearly every recruiter will want to see an applicant’s CV and it is essential it makes an impression.

 

Here are her eight top tips:

1. Hit them between the eyes

The first four to six lines of the personal profile at the top of the CV are the most important part. All relevant experience should be detailed here. Say why you fit the criteria listed in the job description.

2. Show you can add value

Too often people write their CV from their current job description. Instead, show your experience and how you have done things well in the past. Tell the employer all the positive things you have achieved

3. Make the most of "you"

Regardless of employment history, employers will look for potential. If you’re tech-savvy, have an interest in a certain area or have volunteered to develop a certain skill, tell them about it.

 

Read now: How to write a winning business plan! Don't miss out...

4. Ask for help

There are lots of people who struggle with literacy, but the harsh reality is recruiters have no tolerance for spelling errors. Get a friend or career coach to help. Your CV must be impeccably presented

5. Don't use a photo

There are some countries, such as Germany, where companies like you to put a photo on a CV. But in the UK, don’t do it. Given the strength of antidiscrimination legislation, the protocol is not to do it

6. Use keywords

Many companies automate the first stage of applications, using software to trawl CVs to find keywords, rejecting those which do not match. Use the person specification and show how you fit it

7. You have 30 seconds

What we’ve heard about having no time to impress employers is right. If you have not shown you have the relevant experience in 30 seconds of reading time, they won’t bother with the rest of your CV

8. Send a covering letter

It’s another opportunity to sell yourself. Lots of employers will reject someone who hasn’t done it because having one shows that you’ve taken the extra time and made some effort

Twitter Facebook
Rating (0 vote/s)
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.

More Insights

Low cost system ensures profitability

A Gloucestershire dairy farmer relies on a low-cost system which treats the herd as if it were one cow, in order to maintain a profitable business. Wendy Short reports.

Getting sand bedding right

Sand is only one option available for bedding dairy cubicles, posing its own challenges and benefits. Laura Bowyer visited Richard Chewter at a quarry in Hampshire.

Making better use of grass and improving fertility are keys to survival

Ireland’s dairy industry has made substantial improvement in on-farm performance and national output over the past 10 years. Ann Hardy reports from the Ireland Genetics UK Dairy Conference. 

Driving calf growth

Since attending a series of AHDB Dairy Calf to Calving events, Andrew Wallis and Tony White have implemented a number of changes. Farmers Guardian reports.

'Don't take knock-backs personally'

The Scottish Association of Young Farmers Clubs (SAYFC) hosted their third annual Agri and Rural Conference last weekend in Aberdeenshire. Striving for excellence was at the heart of discussion and members were offered advice and inspiration to make it happen. Farmers Guardian reports.
FG Insight and FGInsight.com are trademarks of Briefing Media Ltd.
Farmers Guardian and FarmersGuardian.com are trademarks of Farmers Guardian Ltd, a subsidiary of Briefing Media Ltd.
All material published on FGInsight.com and FarmersGuardian.com is copyrighted © 2016 by Briefing Media Limited. All rights reserved.
RSS news feeds