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On test: Deutz Agrotron K 430 tractor / Stoll ProfiLine FZ20

Insights

Inside, a well finished, high quality, light grey interior provides a spacious and airy environment to work in.

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Cab and controls - 9/10

Wide galvanised steps and wide opening, almost panoramic, doors provide unhindered access to the Agrotron’s cab. Inside, a well finished, high quality, light grey interior provides a spacious and airy environment to work in.


Most of its controls fall conveniently to hand; however, it is not obvious straight away as to what some of them do. For instance, the main gear-stick is occupied by four buttons - none of which are labelled. It is only after a brief tutorial that it becomes clear. Once the guesswork has been taken out of the operation, the Deutz is simple to master.

The hand throttle is not quite as conveniently placed, down by the right-hand side of the seat. It can, however, remember rev settings.

 

Its chunky shuttle lever is well placed alongside the adjustable reach and rake steering column. To clear the windows and keep you warm, the Agrotron features more ventilation than you can shake a stick at.

 

In-cab storage is good. Various cubby holes occupy the fenders and back of the seat for pins, flasks, butty boxes, etc.

 

By sticking with a six-post cab, the tractor allows a bit of fresh air through its side windows. Equipped with cab suspension, the Agrotron provides the smoothest ride out of the quartet on the road and around the yard.

 

As a loader tractor - 8/10

The Agrotron has excellent visibility in the main, helped by its curved bonnet and fenders and transparent roof.

 

However, rear visibility is encroached upon by its curved roof, which, for taller operators, is in your eye-line when looking backward. It does, though, incorporate a pair of handy reversing mirrors mounted below the roof.

 

The Deutz’s hydraulics provided fairly swift action of the Stoll loader, beating both the Kubota and the Zetor, but not quite on a par with the Fergie.

 

When the hydraulics are not being used, instead of circulating the system, oil is automatically short circuited into the reservoir to avoid unnecessary wear and tear and overheating.

 

Transmission control is fairly good. The Agrotron can be easily driven using the de-clutch button on the back of the main gearstick, but changing between the four main gears could feel a bit crisper.

 

Range changes are via a single button, but the gear lever has to be in neutral first and the change involves a bit of a wait.

 

Three smooth powershifts are provided, but when reverse is selected, the powershift defaults to the lowest speed, which is awkward if you want to reverse out of a muck heap quickly.

 

The shuttle’s aggressiveness can be altered via a thumb-wheel mounted on the shuttle lever. The clutch pedal is light, but the steering was slightly heavy.

 

Loader usability- 8/10

The Deutz came fitted with a Stoll Profiline FZ20 loader, with standard individual pipe couplings, joystick/cable controls and boom suspension. Options include HydraFix block coupler and electric controls.

 

Stoll incorporates its parallel linkage mechanism into the loader’s framework, which it calls Z-Kinematick. This allows weight which is acting upon an attachment to be transferred into a lifting force. By doing this, the manufacturer has also managed to maximise visibility over the top of the booms.

 

Although the loader does appear to be mounted quite far forward, it, in combination with the tractor, feels like a very stable package - even with the rear ballast removed.

 

Getting the loader on and off was not too much of a chore. All of our test machines employ fold down legs to support the loader. Once these have been lowered, the locks can be undone and hydraulics disconnected.

 

The Stoll’s flat-headed hydraulic couplings really helped, unlike the new paintwork. Re-attaching takes a little bit of precision - you have to be quite accurate when lining up the tractor and loader.

 

Sight-lines to the tool carrier were hampered by the loader’s fat cross-member, which houses the accumulator ram for the boom suspension. It was okay in the air, but it was a real pain when hooking up to attachments.

 

Rear end - 9/10

At the rear, Deutz has managed to keep everything relatively simple.

 

Chunky drop-links and stabilisers instil a certain amount of confidence that this tractor could easily handle various types of machinery.

 

The rear fenders also include linkage and pto controls.

 

The Agrotron features an independent 35-litre hydraulic reservoir and is equipped, as standard, with three double-acting spool valves, which can also be coupled up under pressure.

 

These are controlled mechanically via cross-gate spool levers, allowing two services to be controlled at the same time. Oil levels can be easily checked via a sight-glass.

 

The Deutz’s four-litre motor quietly provided plenty of grunt for all of our tasks. When hooked up to a 10-tonne West trailer fully laden with muck, it breezed up a 12 per cent gradient hill.

 

During the main mucking out task, thanks to the transmission and relatively swift hydraulics, the Agrotron quite happily worked away at between 1,200rpm and 1,400rpm.

 

It is not quite as low as the Fergie’s, but is still a credible effort. On the road, it also knocks back the revs to 1,900rpm in top gear to reduce fuel consumption.

 

Even with the loader on the floor, the engine bay is still accessible. Underneath its curved bonnet hides a compact arrangement of radiators, which fold up and forwards for easy maintenance.

 

Engine and maintenance - 9/10

The Deutz’s four-litre motor quietly provided plenty of grunt for all of our tasks. When hooked up to a 10-tonne West trailer fully laden with muck, it breezed up a 12 per cent gradient hill.

 

During the main mucking out task, thanks to the transmission and relatively swift hydraulics, the Agrotron quite happily worked away at between 1,200rpm and 1,400rpm.

 

It is not quite as low as the Fergie’s, but is still a credible effort. On the road, it also knocks back the revs to 1,900rpm in top gear to reduce fuel consumption.

 

Even with the loader on the floor, the engine bay is still accessible. Underneath its curved bonnet hides a compact arrangement of radiators, which fold up and forwards for easy maintenance.

 

FG Verdict - 43/50

When it comes to striking looks, the Deutz is undoubtedly the winner. Unfortunately, looks are not everything. However, it did put in a very credible performance.

 

Probably out of the four, the Agrotron is the least ‘jump on and drive’, but only marginally. Once the controls have been worked out, though, it is probably one of the nicest to drive.

 

Overall, it is a very smooth, quiet, well finished tractor. With just a bit more oil-flow and a tidied up transmission, the Agrotron would be on a par with the Fergie - it certainly is not far behind.

 

Base retail price for tractor is £63,692. Base retail price for the loader is £7,600.

 

Specifications

Deutz Agrotron K 430 tractor

  • Engine: Four-litre, four-cylinder Deutz
  • Power: 112hp (rated), 130hp (boosted)
  • Torque: 492Nm (max)
  • Transmission: 24 forward, eight reverse, with three-speed powershift
  • pto speeds: 540, 540E, 1,000 and 1,000Erpm
  • Hydraulic flow rate: 75 litres/min load sensing
  • Rear-linkage lift capacity: 6,220kg
  • Wheelbase: 2,419mm
  • Base weight: 4,440kg
  • Tyres: Trelleborg TM 700, 480/70 R38 (rear) and 380/70 R28 (front)
  • Service intervals: 500 hours

Stoll ProfiLine FZ20 Loader

  • Lift capacity at full height: 1,860kg
  • Maximum lift height: 3,740mm
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