FG BUY&SELL        FARMERS WEATHER       ARABLE FARMING        DAIRY FARMER      FARMERS GUARDIAN        AGRIMONEY        OUR EVENTS        MEMBERSHIP BENEFITS        BLOGS        MORE FROM US

You are viewing 1 of your 2 free articles

You’ll need to join us by becoming a member to gain more access.
Already a Member?

Login Join us now

On-test: Old favourite, Nissan X-Trail, gets updated

Insights

When Nissan’s X-Trail first arrived on the scene in 2001, it quickly won over farming friends with its old-school SUV styling, robust, boxy looks and a meaty 2.2-litre and then 2-litre, turbo diesel. And now there is a new version. Geoff Ashcroft takes it for a test drive.

Twitter Facebook

Moving with the times, the Japanese maker has replaced it with another ultra-modern version complete with more refinement, more kit and a downsized engine.

 

It’s fair to say that this latest X-Trail shares much with its Qashqai sibling, albeit in a slightly bigger package. And in addition to replacing the original X-Trail, this new version also fills a gap left by the Qashqai+2. As a result, it offers seven-seat capability – the two extra rear seats being a £200 option for our test model.

 

Replacing the old model’s 2.0-litre is a much more refined and fuel-efficient 1.6-litre, 130hp diesel engine. It can be mated to a six-speed manual box, offering two- and four-wheel drive, or a six-speed auto box – the latter in two-wheel drive only.

 

Performance

Performance

You do need to work the engine. It lacks torque at low revs, but get the turbo buzzing and there’s enough under the skin to handle the X-Trail’s bulk.

 

Our six-speed manual was light and easy to use, though the gear stick had more than enough throw.

 

If you’re careful, you should net 50mpg. But if you’re busy with the pedals, or making use of its two-tonne towing capacity, then there’s a price to pay with fuel economy.

 

Inside the cabin, X-Trail mimmicks the Qashqai. Though there is more room and the sliding and folding middle row of seats adds an extra dimension for the trade-off between passengers and luggage.

 

Interior

Interior

If you can live without that third row of seats, you’ll get much more load space at the back too – typically, 105 litres more. A useful multi-position luggage board helps you to divide space accordingly.

 

This top-spec Tekna version wanted for nothing, and had more attention and alert systems than a London safe deposit box. Rear view camera, intelligent key, around view monitor, parking assist, powered tailgate, emergency braking, lane departure warning and traffic signal recognition and some of the gadgets you’ll find on the Tekna grade.

 

But with a price tag starting on the wrong side of thirty grand, you’d rather hope so.

 

Need to know:

  • Model: Nissan X-Trail Tekna
  • Price: £31,345 (£32,695 as tested)
  • Engine: 1.6-litre, four-cylinder turbo diesel, 130hp @ 4,000rpm, 320Nm @ 1,750rpm
  • Transmission: Six-speed manual, selectable All Mode 4x4i
  • Performance: 116mph, 53.3mpg combined, 139g/km
  • Towing capacity: 2,000kgs
Twitter Facebook
Rating (0 vote/s)
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.

More Insights

On-test: JCB 403: old vs new

After almost 10 years of production, JCB has updated its 403 compact loader. Richard Bradley looks at the key changes between the old and new machines.

Lamma Preview 2017: Pimp your tractor

Lightbars, mats, mirror guards and custom paintwork is a common sight on lorries, but an increasing number of tractor drivers are starting to customise their steeds. Geoff Ashcroft reports.

On-test: Vitara joins crossover club

Suzuki has transformed its Vitara from a full-blown 4x4, into a sporty crossover. Geoff Ashcroft takes the new model for a test drive.

Lamma Preview 2017: The need to know on drones

If a drone is on your 2017 shopping list, then a visit to Lamma could help with your research. Geoff Ashcroft reports.

Muck and slurry: Making the most of slurry

Splash plate spreading of slurry onto the field may be quick and easy, but it may not be making the most of your natural fertiliser. Richard Bradley seeks out expert advice to find out more.
FG Insight and FGInsight.com are trademarks of Briefing Media Ltd.
Farmers Guardian and FarmersGuardian.com are trademarks of Farmers Guardian Ltd, a subsidiary of Briefing Media Ltd.
All material published on FGInsight.com and FarmersGuardian.com is copyrighted © 2016 by Briefing Media Limited. All rights reserved.
RSS news feeds