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Steve Heard: Ploughing roads and towing cars are farmers' typical snow sports

Insights

Snow-exciting and problematic

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However, even before we could get our sledges attached to the quad bike, a call for help had already come through from the county council.

 

It is quite amazing the effect a few inches of snow can cause. Suddenly our big, slow, nuisance tractors are welcomed onto the public highways with great enthusiasm and trails of cars become truly grateful to follow behind a farmers’ snowplough.

 

Steve Heard, Leicestershire

Steve Heard farms at Illston on the Hill, Leicestershire. He grows a variety of combinable crops on 1,192ha (2,945 acres) of land, which is rented and contract farmed. He also runs an arable contracting business, and is a keen user of new technology.

Of course, clearing the roads would be a much simpler task if it were not for the number of useless sporty cars struggling at every slight incline. It is clear wide, low-profile tyres do little to enhance an average driver’s icy road-skills.

 

Most cars are, apparently, poorly equipped to drive in snow but many also do not have anywhere to attach a tow rope. So, having waited for their hero in Claas overalls to arrive, the fun really begins with a rushed attempt to empty a boot full of Christmas presents and eventually locate the threaded towing eye, hidden deep under the most inaccessible flooring.

 

Last week I read with some amusement as Peter Chapman described the story of his encounter with the DVLA about his cloned lorry.

 

We too had a similar incident some years ago, with a summons from an inner-London borough council, regarding a serious parking fine allegedly relating to a John Deere combine.

 

Fortunately, I did not have to argue how such a huge machine could have been abandoned on a Hammersmith kerb - it had disappeared from my farm in a cloud of smoke several harvests earlier and I had all the relevant documents to prove it.

 

For the moment, I am just looking forward to enjoying the snow again - I will be escaping to the Alps for a few days of snowboarding before my accountant finalises my tax return for the end of the month.

 

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